Three Tonal Considerations for Designing and Theming Rooms 

Creating a unique and perfect living space is going to provide a consistent challenge.  Whether you are working for yourself or designing for others, getting the balance, tone and feel of a room right is always going to be a subjective and complex affair.  This gauntlet can be made even more taxing if there are specific themes or items that need to be incorporated into the design considerations.  However, these extra stipulations don’t have to be a restriction, they can actually prove to be of significant benefit if you utilise them as a guiding factor.

antique furniture

Contrast

Having a single colour and tone throughout a room is a seriously difficult look to pull off and it only works in a very small percentage of cases.  If you were to contrast the colour tones of your floor or walls with your furniture, then you are starting to pick out defining factors within the decor.  A popular style is to use reproduction furniture to achieve a degree of historical opulence, so you could contrast a pale floor colour with a dark stained replica Louis XVI dining chair or armchair for example.  This contrast will help lift the item of furniture away from its surroundings and make it ‘pop’.

Restrict yourself to a dominant tone

When incorporating wood into a rooms design, it is important to try and remain consistent with the tones used.  Having light and dark wood intermixing will often make a room look busy and disorganised, so having a dominant wood tone will enable you to structure and style accordingly.  Keeping either a dark or a light theming within your wood means that the tones of the rest of the room can flow from that choice.  As discussed above, if you have a dark dominant wood tone, then this can be offset with lighter coloured walls or floors to really accentuate the items.

Antiques furnitureBe true to your theme

There is always going to be a struggle between theming and colour choices.  You may love purple, but this is not going to work in a nautically themed room, to offer a fairly extreme example.  Many people find that they simply pick a colour for their rooms and then find things that don’t stand out to dress the space, but it is often a lot more effective to work the other way round.  To use an earlier example, if you are theming using historical furniture, such as French Provincial Furniture From ARS, then you have a clear theme in place.  You can work from these items that you desire for your room and pull the colour and tones from them to design the rest of the space.  This will lead to a far greater cohesion within the room and give a much better overall result .  Afterall, if you have a theme you wish to implement, then why should you betray that ideal over colour choices.